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Computer Image Corporation records

 Collection
Identifier: CBI 256
This collection consists of mostly administrative materials and includes meeting minutes, meeting agendas, financial documents, correspondence, client files, publicity, newspaper and magazine clippings, photographs, art, storyboards, cassette tapes, reel to reels, slides, manuals, and reports. Materials date between ca. 1840 and 1997, but the bulk of the materials date between 1968 and 1989.

Dates

  • ca. 1840-1997
  • Majority of material found within 1968-1989

Conditions Governing Access

This collection may be protected by the Copyright Law of the United States (Title 17, U.S. Code). It is the user's responsibility to verify copyright ownership and to obtain all necessary permissions prior to the reproduction, publication, or other use of any portion of these materials. Researchers may quote from the collection under the fair use provision of the copyright law.

Conditions Governing Use

Open for use in the Elmer L. Andersen Library reading room.

Extent

16 Cubic Feet (17 boxes (12 paige boxes, 2 Hollinger boxes, 3 oversize flat boxes))

Overview

This collection consists of the administrative materials related to Computer Image Corporation, a business based in Denver, Colorado that focused on making analog computer graphics in the 1970s.

Biographical / Historical

Computer Image Corporation began in Denver, Colorado in the late 1960s as the brainchild of Lee Harrison III. Computer Image Corporation (CIC) worked with creating graphics animation, character animation, and special effects for video. Their machines, including Animac, CAESAR, and Scanimate, were cutting edge in the 1970s, and CIC worked with many different clients around the world. Lee received the first ever Technical Achievement Emmy Award in 1973.

Scanimate is an analog computer system that views high contract line negative black and white artwork or generates its own images, using scan conversion to manipulate television, creating animations in real time. Only eight machines were ever produced. Caesar was the same as Scanimate except that the system employs a digital computer for precise timing and positioning, permitting longer animation sequences.

Lee Harrison III was born in 1929 and passed away in 1998.

Arrangement

This collection is organized into series:

Series 1: Correspondence, Memorandum, and Notes

Series 2: Meeting Minutes

Series 3: Agreements and General Business Files

Series 4: Financial

Series 5: Reports

Series 6: Manuals

Series 7: Photographs and Art

Series 8: Publicity
Title
Computer Image Corporation records, ca. 1840 -1997
Status
completed
Author
Kate Dietrick
Date
April 2017
Description rules
dacs
Language of description
English

Collecting Area

Part of the Charles Babbage Institute Archives Collecting Area

Contact:

612-624-5050