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George and Tatiana Grebenstchikoff papers

 Collection
Identifier: IHRC809
Correspondence, diaries, photographs, manuscripts of Grebenstchikoff's literary works, one audio tape, and some print materials including G. Grebenstchikoff's poetry and some rare books - handset, printed on handmade paper and artistically bound in the book shop of Tatiana Grebenstchikoff.

Dates

  • 1910-1964

Creator

Language of Materials

English, Russian

ACCESS RESTRICTIONS

Open for use in the Elmer L. Andersen Library reading room.

OWNERSHIP & LITERARY RIGHTS

This collection may be protected by the Copyright Law of the United States (Title 17, U.S. Code). It is the user's responsibility to verify copyright ownership and to obtain all necessary permissions prior to the reproduction, publication, or other use of any portion of these materials. Researchers may quote from the collection under the fair use provision of the copyright law.

For further information regarding the copyright, please contact the IHRCA.

Extent

17 Linear Feet

HISTORICAL SKETCH

George Grebenstchikoff (1883-1964) immigrated to the United States after World War I, to escape the post-1917 revolutionary regime in Russia. Grebenstchikoff had been an officer in the Tzar's army. His first published works appeared while still in Russia. After his arrival in the United States, Grebenstchikoff continued to publish his works both in Russian and English. He also taught the Russian language and literature at various American universities, spending the majority of his teaching career at the University of South Florida. The community formed around Churaevka, a retreat for artists that the Grebenstchikoff's founded and built in Connecticut in the 1930's became a center of cultural activities of a number of Russian émigré and other artists. Tatiana Grebenstchikoff (1896-1964) was an artist, producing - among others - rare books in her shop in Florida.

PROVENANCE

Collection acquired from the Lakeland Public Library in Florida in 2001.
Author
IHRC
Description rules
dacs
Language of description
Finding Aid in English

Collecting Area Details

Contact The Immigration History Research Center Archives Collecting Area

Contact:

612-625-4800